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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    11,896

    Will it Ever be the Same Again?

    I was contracting in Brizzle last week so nipped out for a 'table for one' cuzzer to my favourite ruby house...It was fecking mobbed so the Indy-bum chap asked a big table of blokes if I could squeeze on the end as there was a seat and it was agreed!

    I did the usual contractor thing of diving onto my phone but listening to their conversation...They were obviously all self-made/successful business men who had been on a golfing day out and were rounding it off with a ruby. They all seemed to be long-term friends and many of them played rugby together as well by the sound of it...But they were bickering over Brexit...someone had broken the new 1st rule of not mentioning it in a social setting and now they were sniping at each other and it was spoiling their evening by the look of it...

    And I thought 'isn't the UK an angry and generally less happy place to reside at the moment?'.

    Then I wondered 'Will we ever get back to some sort of parity/a happier place ever again?' as no matter which way the next few months go half the country is going to be very p1ssed off.

    Thoughts from you feckers?
    Last edited by Vim_Fuego; 13-03-2019 at 10:42.
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    The Goat lives because you post interesting stuff...stop doing that and it will die...so show us your stuff!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    At the uckers table
    Posts
    6,117
    Canít see a way back. Iíve canít recall people being so polarised or p1ssed off about something.

    That said, in my social and work circles, it never comes up.

    I do wonder if the so called outrage on both sides is a media invention.
    .
    .
    It is a good rule in life never to apologise. The right sort of people do not want apologies, and the wrong sort take a mean advantage of them.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Living by the C
    Posts
    5,592
    Be better when its over, cant see it being over for a while yet....

    Away from those that sit in parliament there is still a majority of the population that want to leave rather than actively want to stay. The remain vote would have been bolstered by those who vote for the status quo rather than being all those that activily want to remain.

    There will be some who will feel wronged if we remain, a second referendum will be much more decisive compared to the first.

    Hate to think what will happen if we end up not leaving, as I think once we leave it'll all settle down.


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  4. Don't think it'll ever be the same again. Nearly 3 years of dithering about by the Tories as done more to split this country then anything that's happened in the past.

    This says it all about the main brexit protagonists.



    Edit

    There is a proper role for referendums in constitutional change, but only if done properly. If it is not done properly, it can be a dangerous tool. The Chairman of the Public Administration Committee, who is no longer in the Chamber, said that Clement Attleeówho is, I think, one of the Deputy Prime Minister's heroesófamously described the referendum as the device of demagogues and dictators. We may not always go as far as he did, but what is certain is that pre-legislative referendums of the type the Deputy Prime Minister is proposing are the worst type of all. ∂ Referendums should be held when the electorate are in the best possible position to make a judgment. They should be held when people can view all the arguments for and against and when those arguments have been rigorously tested. In short, referendums should be held when people know exactly what they are getting. So legislation should be debated by Members of Parliament on the Floor of the House, and then put to the electorate for the voters to judge. ∂ We should not ask people to vote on a blank sheet of paper and tell them to trust us to fill in the details afterwards. For referendums to be fair and compatible with our parliamentary process, we need the electors to be as well informed as possible and to know exactly what they are voting for. Referendums need to be treated as an addition to the parliamentary process, not as a substitute for it.



    I'm a citizen not a subject
    "The socialism I believe in is everybody working for the same goal and everybody having a share in the rewards. That's how I see football, that's how I see life."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Near Blackpool.....
    Posts
    4,147
    Well, in my windswept corner of the North West, I can honestly say that the "B" word is generally not discussed; when you do mention it the prevailing schools of thought seem to be (in no particular order):


    • The Tories are idiots for managing to negotiate a deal that is hated by just about everyone - including the blokes who negotiated it.



    • If our Labour MP gets re-elected then it will be a miracle of biblical proportions, given that a sizeable portion of her constituency voted leave and still want to leave - even though she wants another referendum.



    • If there is a 2nd referendum which asks "do you want to a) leave with no deal, b) leave with the PMs deal or c) stay in the EU, and the people go for c), then that will be the catalyst for every right wing nut job to resort to violence and god knows what - probably involving Owen Jones, an oxy-acetelene torch and some Marmite. It will also demonstrate to the vast majority of sane Brexit voters that there is literally no point in voting for anything ever again, resulting in the kind of low turnout at elections never before seen



    • May maybe finished as PM, but Corbyn's stocjk has not risen over the last three years either.


    Anyhoo, (and with thanks to The Poke), here's the line up for the first concert to be held post brexit...

    Brexit.jpg
    Kryten Personal Black Box Recording. Time: unknown. Location: unknown. Cause of accident: unknown. Perhaps if someone finds this recording it will shed light as to what happened here. My short-term memory appears to have been erased.This I ascribe to the proximity of the magnetic coils from Starbug's rear engine. (He looks around briefly) Secondly, due to the proximity of the magnetic coils, my short-term memory appears to have been erased.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    127.3 miles from Saints
    Posts
    6,994
    One topic that crops up again and again in my Monday morning 4 ball is the fact that the politicians seem more concerned with promoting their own personal views, having a 6 o'clock news worthy sound bite and party points scoring against the other side (whichever side they are on) rather than enacting the decision of the people. As supposedly the mother of all Parliaments and the cradle of democracy it's very undemocratic place at the moment. My 4 ball are all retired blokes me ex-RAF, an ex-railwayman, a former Dunlop Tyre salesman and former NHS mental health nurse. There are widespread and differing views in the group. One is worried about the dark purple of UKIP infilrating the hated Tories (he probably dislikes them more than the shadow Chancellor) leading to a imminent far right take over, another worries about the influence of unelected momentum activists lurching the labour party further to the left, the other two occupy a more centre ground. One thing we all agree on though is the complete cluster that is the B thing needs sorting with less dither and more doing.
    Last edited by Tin basher; 13-03-2019 at 19:33.
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  7. Iím in Scotland and the ****s have just got ****ier since our referendum in 2014. I fully expect that to happen across the whole Country now.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Far away from London control in Manchester
    Posts
    391
    On a similar point what ifs: The majority voted to remain in EU soiling grasp. Would we now run headlong into having the Euro currency and ditch our dear old Queen coins in fervent rapture. If somebody questions whether our boss The Queen is an ardent Brexiteer, I would say yes out of self preservation. Would the garden be rosier when the open doors are expected to take hold as they should. Hey I am all for progress and with the New Generation growing up wanting EU to govern them more and more. Is the blight of our Government car crass not given more ardour to these new fledglings to look at EU Parliament as the new utopia. At least one thing when the dust settles our Parliament will suffer either way now. To remain in the EU would mean our political parties are just councils for the US of Europe to control. To be out now new parties will merge from the wreak of old politics from younger idealism.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Exactly where I want to be
    Posts
    2,075
    In my fishing village (Lincoln) 56.9% voted to leave the EU. Even those who wanted to remain are far from happy with how the EU have acted in their deliberations with the ĎUn-United Kingdomí.

    IMHO Brexit isnít going to happen, not how I wanted, I.e. a complete break from the EU and all itís institutions. I would suggest that all those in leave voting areas look at how their MP voted and act accordingly. They can easily be replaced with another drone.
    'It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is; it doesn't matter how smart you are. If it doesn't agree with experiment, it's wrong', Richard Feynman.

    'Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason', Mark Twain.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Living by the C
    Posts
    5,592
    So the majority in a non binding vote in parliament was less than 1% to avoid no deal, not really a killer blow.

    Lets say that UKIP stood back up stating that they will stand candidates in majority leave voting areas and then once Leave was through they would stand down and have a by election, would you, if you were a leaver, vote for them, on this basis?


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    Life begins at 40, with a nice payout and job to find

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